• Editing Japanese Documents with Kami

    Japanese documentation is quite different for many reasons. Aside from its departure from the standard 26-letter alphabet, its encoding means that you’d have to deal with logographic character “embedding” in a screen space that is double that which you are typically used to. As such, using Kami with these documents may take a bit more than your usual method, so here are a few tips to get your work efficiently through: Handwritten Japanese should be manually marked. It’s enough that the character system is already complex, but when dealing with handwritten versions of the stuff, things can just get far more complicated. To bypass this would-be problem, the handwritten text…

  • 4 Things to Note about Japanese Annotation

    Annotating text in PDF viewers has been more or less a no-brainer; it’s even better now because such features only require very simple interface access and equally simple drag and click actions. However, when it comes to annotating a different language, particularly the ‘mystical’ East Asian languages, then there might be more than a few things that you want to learn or remember to do efficiently. For Japanese, here are four basic pointers: Clauses and Phrases: Where’s the end? The Japanese language is known to look as if it is an endless stream of text and letters without any spaces, spare for the sentence-ending punctuation marks. Highlighting the needed annotations…